Water and wetlands

Wynchnor Washland — part of Staffordshire WT’s Farming Floodplains For the Future project (credit Nick Mott)

Wetlands are vital part of our natural world – the lives of animals, plants and people depend on their health. Wetlands provide food, water, transport networks, help reduce the impacts of extreme weather events and are places of beauty and inspiration.

The Wildlife Trusts have been helping to lead wetland conservation in the UK for many years — working on rivers, streams, lakes, ponds and estuaries.

Wetlands — habitats under pressure

Unfortunately wetlands are some of our most damaged habitats. Nearly half of all floodplains in England and Wales are now separated from their rivers, wetland habitats are highly fragmented, they continue to be lost through drainage and over abstraction, they are impacted by diffuse and point source pollution in both rural and urban areas. Wetlands are being colonised by non-native invasive species and are under pressure from development.

We are living with a legacy of past damage to our wetlands and new challenges threaten what remains. Climate change has already resulted in water temperature increases of 1.5–3°C in many rivers over the past two decades. In some river catchments juvenile populations of […]

More about rivers and watersheds:

As Feds Weaken Wetlands Rules, Locals Eye Greater Protections For Otter Creek Swamps

Working for our wetlands

Why river floodplains are key to preserving nature and biodiversity in western USA

How planting trees and grasses can help stabilise farmland in a changing climate

Rivers cover lots more of the Earth than we thought

The veins of America: Stunning map shows every river basin in the USA

River Revives After Largest Dam Removal in USA History

Cleansing the Air at the Expense of Waterways

3 Surprising Ways Water Depends on Healthy Forests

Summary
Water and wetlands
Article Name
Water and wetlands
Description
Wetlands are vital part of our natural world -- the lives of animals, plants and people depend on their health. Unfortunately wetlands are some of our most damaged habitats: fragmented, lost through drainage, impacted by invasive species, development, diffuse and point source pollution in both rural and urban areas.
Author
Publisher Name
The Wildlife Trusts
Publisher Logo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *