Washington state to use dog to detect invasive mussels on boats

This photo provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows a group of zebra mussels. Government officials are cracking down on ships that allow in invasive species. (Anonymous/The Associated Press)

Quagga and zebra mussels siphon in water to pluck out microscopic organisms that can throw food chains out of balance, and their sheer numbers in attaching to surfaces can clog pipes at reservoirs and damage boat motors.

A dog could soon be helping check boats and prevent invasive mussels from entering the state, the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife said. The agency told KREM-TV in Spokane that the dog will likely be stationed in that city and work mostly at the Stateline boat-check station looking for quagga and zebra mussels.

The agency said it will use grant money to purchase the canine help next year. “When you have physical inspections with a technician, an inspection could take five to 10 minutes,” said Eric Anderson of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. “When you have a dog, it’s able to sniff the outside of the boat. That inspection could go down to maybe a minute or two minutes.”

Quagga and zebra mussels siphon in water to pluck out […]

More about mussels and ecosystems:

Texas Mussel Watch: Texas Freshwater Mussel Biology

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels’ shells

Microplastics in our mussels: the sea is feeding human garbage back to us

EPA researching freshwater mussels as biofilters in PA, MD and WV

Summary
Washington state to use dog to detect invasive mussels on boats
Article Name
Washington state to use dog to detect invasive mussels on boats
Description
A dog could soon help block invasive mussels from Washington State. It will likely work at the Stateline boat-check looking for quagga and zebra mussels.
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The Seattle Times
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