Microplastics in our mussels: the sea is feeding human garbage back to us

Shellfish are the natural filter systems of our seas, mechanisms of purity. So, to discover in a report released on World Oceans Day that mussels bought from UK supermarkets were infested with microplastic seems like a final irony in the terrible story of the plasticisation of the sea.

According to the study by the University of Hull and Brunel University London, 70 particles of microplastic were found in every 100 grams of mussels. There’s a vital disconnection here – highlighted by the bottled water you drink to wash down your moules-frites, and the fact that 89% of ocean trash comes from single-use plastic.

No sea is immune from this plague, nor any ocean creature, from the modest mussel or zooplankton to the great whales. I have just returned from Cape Cod, where, due to pollution and other anthropogenic effects, the North Atlantic right whale may be extinct by 2040 – a huge mammal about to vanish from the sight of the shores of the richest, most powerful nation on Earth.

On the pristine, remote Cisco Beach on Nantucket, I watched a grey seal watching me – only to realise the sleek pelage of its midriff was bound with […]

More about microplastics and contamination:

Gonzaga study reveals high levels of microplastics in Spokane River, suggests particles in drinking water as well

Microplastics are getting into mosquitoes, contaminating new food chains

Proving Terrible For the Marine Life: Microplastics

Humans, fish and other animals are consuming microfibers in food and water

Plastic degrading in the oceans release chemicals into the water

Microplastics found in more than 90% of bottled water, study says

Everyone Is Applauding National Geographic’s Cover — But Shock Lies Inside

Summary
Microplastics in our mussels: the sea is feeding human garbage back to us
Article Name
Microplastics in our mussels: the sea is feeding human garbage back to us
Description
Shellfish are natural filter systems, mechanisms of purity. To find mussels infested with microplastic seems like irony in a terrible story of ocean life.
Author
Publisher Name
The Guardian
Publisher Logo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *