‘Sunny day flooding’ worsens at NC beaches — a sign sea rise is decades too soon

Living in cities threatened by sea-level rise could be like living near an active volcano, according to NOAA oceanographer William Sweet. Some parts of the Earth are seeing sea levels rise far beyond average, and it’s just a waiting game before some areas are inundated with sea water, studies show.

The East Coast of the U.S. is experiencing "sunny day flooding" that scientists didn’t expect for decades yet. Sea levels are rising at a rate of about an inch per year (5 inches from 2011–15) in some areas along the East Coast, from North Carolina to Florida, according to one study — that’s faster than researchers expected.

Residents of coastal communities most often feel the effects of sea level rise during tidal flooding. Tidal flooding, also known as "sunny day flooding" is the temporary inundation of low-lying areas, such as roads, during high-tide events — especially during "king tides," the highest tides of the year. King tides aren’t caused […]

More about sea-level rise, coastal flooding and more:

From Atlantic City to Key West: 21 beach towns that will soon be under water

Three newspapers confront one challenge: Sea-level rise is real

Fast and Getting Faster: The Verdict on Sea Level Rise from the Latest National Climate Assessment

Water World: Sea Level Rise, Coastal Floods and Storm Surges

Satellite Snafu Masked True Sea Level Rise for Decades

The lesser-known threat from sea-level rise? Saltwater intrusion into Florida’s freshwater wells.

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‘Sunny day flooding’ worsens at NC beaches - a sign sea rise is decades too soon
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‘Sunny day flooding’ worsens at NC beaches - a sign sea rise is decades too soon
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The East Coast of the U.S. is experiencing "sunny day flooding" scientists didn't expect for decades. Sea levels are rising about an inch per year (5 inches from 2011-2015) in some areas along the East Coast, from North Carolina to Florida, according to one study - that's faster than researchers expected.
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The News & Observer
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