Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR): combat poverty and hunger through land and vegetation restoration

Introduction

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) is a low-cost land restoration technique used to combat poverty and hunger amongst poor subsistence farmers by increasing food and timber production and resilience to climate extremes. Started in 1983 in Niger, FMNR is a form of coppicing and pollarding, drawing on traditional practices and sensitive to local variations.

In FMNR systems, farmers protect and manage the growth of trees and shrubs that regenerate naturally in their fields from root stock or from seeds dispersed through animal manure. FMNR is an easy, low-cost way for farmers to increase the number of trees in the fields.

Objective of the practice

Through the restoration of vegetation, FMNR addresses multiple problems simultaneously, including: land degradation, soil infertility and erosion, biodiversity loss, food insecurity, fuel wood, building timber and fodder shortages and dysfunctional hydrological cycles (exacerbated flood and drought events, reduced ground water recharge, drying of springs, wells and streams). FMNR is both an effective climate mitigation and adaptation intervention. At scale, FMNR contributes to increased recharge of groundwater and increased soil moisture, and more so when done in combination with physical soil and water conservation measures. Through these impacts, FMNR is an effective means of reducing poverty even of those furthest behind.

The main goal is to improve livelihoods through improved […]

Summary
Article Name
Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR): combat poverty and hunger through land and vegetation restoration
Description
Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration is a low-cost land restoration method to combat poverty and hunger in subsistence farmers by increasing production and resilience.
Author
Publisher Name
United Nations
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