California’s Central Valley may never recover from past and future droughts

Groundwater in California's Central Valley may be unable to recover from past and future droughts

Water in the San Luis reservoir, which was constructed as a storage reservoir in California’s Central Valley. Groundwater in this region may never be able to recover from past and future droughts, according to new research published in Water Resources Research. Credit: Fredrick Lee

Groundwater in California’s Central Valley is at risk of being depleted by pumping too much water during and after droughts, according to a new study … [more…]

Principal Aquifers of the United States

Principal Aquifers of the United States

This principal aquifers map is available for download as a wall-map-sized PDF (14.4 MB), a printable PDF (1.7 MB), or available for purchase from the USGS Store.

An aquifer is a geologic formation, a group of formations, or a part of a formation that contains sufficient saturated permeable material to yield significant quantities of water to wells and springs. The areal and vertical location of major aquifers is fundamental to … [more…]

Arizona’s New Digital and Interactive Water Encyclopedia

Arizona’s New Digital and Interactive Water Encyclopedia

We all understand the importance of water in Arizona, but the hydrology, legalities, and water management can be overwhelmingly complicated. So how do we get educated on all the issues and challenges while finding facts to offer us a real glimpse into Arizona’s water story? Well, ASU’s Kyl Center for Water Policy has created a great place to start.

Their new platform – the Arizona Water Blueprint, which is an … [more…]

Large contribution from anthropogenic warming to an emerging North American megadrought

A trend of warming and drying

Global warming has pushed what would have been a moderate drought in southwestern North America into megadrought territory. Williams et al. used a combination of hydrological modeling and tree-ring reconstructions of summer soil moisture to show that the period from 2000 to 2018 was the driest 19-year span since the late 1500s and the second driest since 800 CE (see the Perspective by Stahle). … [more…]

Mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species

Mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species

Credit: University of Tennessee

Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. An applied mathematician at UT has developed a partial differential equation model to find the desired flow rate to reduce invasive populations.

The model is detailed in a new paper by Suzanne Lenhart, Chancellor’s Professor and James R. Cox Professor of Mathematics, published in Mathematics.

"Invasives

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