Phosphate giant Mosaic agrees to pay nearly $2 billion over mishandling of hazardous waste

Mosaic Fertilizer, the world’s largest phosphate mining company, has agreed to pay nearly $2 billion to settle a federal lawsuit over hazardous waste and to clean up operations at six Florida sites and two in Louisiana, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday.

"The 60 billion pounds of hazardous waste addressed in this case is the largest amount ever covered by a federal or state . . . settlement and will ensure that wastewater at Mosaic’s facilities is properly managed and does not pose a threat to groundwater resources," the EPA said.

The EPA had accused Mosaic of improper storage and disposal of waste from the production of phosphoric and sulfuric acids, key components of fertilizers, at Mosaic’s facilities in Bartow, New Wales, Mulberry, Riverview, South Pierce and Green Bay in Florida, as well as two sites in Louisiana.

The EPA said it had discovered Mosaic employees were mixing highly corrosive substances from its fertilizer operations with the solid waste and wastewater from mineral processing, in violation of federal and state hazardous waste laws.

"This case is a major victory for clean water, public health and communities across Florida and Louisiana,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance.

Mosaic CEO Joc O’Rourke said the company is “pleased to be bringing this matter to a close” and pledged to be a good environmental steward. The Minnesota-based company was formed in 2004 by a merger of IMC Global with the crop nutrition division of Cargill.

Mosaic officials in Florida said the EPA investigation and negotiations for a settlement have been going on for eight years over practices that everyone in the phosphate industry was doing as well.

The settlement with the EPA, the Justice Department, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality will have no impact on Mosaic’s continued employment or on its future mining expansion plans in DeSoto, Hardee and Manatee counties, they said.

Thursday’s settlement will become final upon approval by the court. The first step in this process is a 30-day public comment period, which is now open, said Julia Valentine, an EPA spokeswoman.

First discovered by an Army Corps of Engineers captain in 1881, Florida’s phosphate deposits today are […]

More about phosphates, mining, and fertilizer effects on water supplies:

Clock Ticking on Florida’s Mountains of Hazardous Phosphate Waste

Chemicals that keep drinking water flowing may also cause fouling

EPA drops rule requiring mining companies’ funding to clean their pollution

South Dakota waterways: dumping grounds for human, industrial, ag wastes

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Phosphate giant Mosaic agrees to pay nearly $2 billion over mishandling of hazardous waste
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EPA found Mosaic employees mixing highly corrosive substances from fertilizer operations with waste from mineral processing, violating hazardous waste laws.
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Tampa Bay Times
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