Dirty water 20 times deadlier to children in conflict zones than bullets – Unicef

Dirty water 20 times deadlier to children in conflict zones than bullets – Unicef

World Water Day study highlights lethal nature of unsafe sanitation and hygiene for children, especially under-fives

Children under five who live in conflict zones are 20 times more likely to die from diarrhoeal diseases linked to unsafe water than from direct violence as a result of war, Unicef has found.

Analysing mortality data from 16 countries beset by long-term conflict – including Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and Yemen – the UN … [more…]

New Mexico: New administration opens up on lead data

document: questionnaire to determine potential lead exposure and need for testing

The NM Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program has 13 questions to help you determine if you should test your child for lead. It’s online at: https://nmhealth.org/publication/view/form/351/

In 2017, Reuters published a map on lead poisoning among children across the nation. The story examined where children were tested for lead and how many had high levels of the toxic metal in their blood. At that time, NM Political Report spent months … [more…]

Flint Water Crisis Deaths Likely Surpass Official Toll

photo: Flint Michigan's water tower. State puts Flint on notice for not fixing water system deficiencies

The death toll in Flint, Michigan, from contaminated water may be much higher than state health officials have acknowledged, an ongoing FRONTLINE investigation has found. The likely killer: Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia caused by the legionella bacteria.

Officially, 90 people were sickened and 12 died from exposure to waterborne legionella bacteria during the 18 months that the city of Flint drew its water from the Flint River … [more…]

Study: Fewer pregnancies, more fetal deaths in Flint after lead levels rose in water

photo: Flint water tower; Study: Fewer pregnancies, more fetal deaths in Flint after lead levels rose in water

Kansas University assistant professor of economics David Slusky explains his study of the Flint water crisis’ impact on fertility rates and fetus deaths in the city. Babies born in Flint after switch to river water also nearly 150 grams lighter than those born in other areas of Michigan, and gained less weight.

The city of Flint saw fewer pregnancies, and a higher number of fetal deaths, during the period women

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