Where’s The Fresh Water Going?

photo: hands cupped to catch clean water flowing out of a spigot

Freshwater Is Disappearing; Can Technology Save Us?

Fresh water is the most important resource for human life on earth.

People can survive far longer without food than without water, and virtually all of our food sources require fresh water to grow or create.

Anna Kucirkova wrote a good story abut this topic for IQSDirectory.com and was kind enough to share it with McCombs Supply.

At McCombs, an appliance parts business … [more…]

On the Chesapeake, A Precarious Future of Rising Seas and High Tides

photo: home being raised above estimated flood levels.

Mike Draper raised his house in southern Dorchester County seven feet to protect it from rising waters. PHOTO BY DAVE HARP

Maryland’s Dorchester County is ground zero for climate change on Chesapeake Bay, as rising seas claim more and more land. An e360 video explores the quiet beauty of this liquid landscape and how high tides and erosion are putting the bay’s rural communities at risk.

I’m making a film … [more…]

Bringing the Chesapeake Bay to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor

Bringing the Chesapeake Bay to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor

The National Aquarium, located in the heart of the nation’s largest estuary, is bringing back estuarine landscapes to Baltimore City.

This blog was written by Charmaine Dahlenburg, Manager of the National Aquarium’s Chesapeake Bay Program. Photo © PAUL BURK

Estuaries are necessary for the health of people and the planet. They capture and filter stormwater runoff, reduce effects of flooding, prevent shoreline erosion and provide habitat for fish, birds, mammals … [more…]

Scientists uncover a centuries-old case of mistaken identity in the Chesapeake Bay

Jellyfish sting swimmers, clog fishing nets, and in high numbers can close beaches. But despite their nuisance to humans, they play an important role in the marine ecosystem – including in the Chesapeake Bay, where they protect commercially valuable Eastern oysters from predators.

Scientists recently discovered that some jellyfish in the Bay are quite different from their ocean cousins. This led scientists from NOAA and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum … [more…]

Meat industry blamed for largest-ever ‘dead zone’ in Gulf of Mexico

Meat industry blamed for largest-ever 'dead zone' in Gulf of Mexico

The global meat industry, already implicated in driving global warming and deforestation, has now been blamed for fueling what is expected to be the worst “dead zone” on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Toxins from manure and fertiliser pouring into waterways are exacerbating huge, harmful algal blooms that create oxygen-deprived stretches of the gulf, the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay, according to a new report by Mighty, an environmental

[more…]