Texas Mussel Watch: Texas Freshwater Mussel Biology

artwork: freshwater mussels rely on key fish species to reproduce and clean aquatic ecosystems

Freshwater mussels, the vacuum cleaners of the aquatic ecosystem, feed by filtering algae and small particles from the water. Larvae are released by the female mussel and must locate a certain fish species or die. They usually attach to the host fish’s gills or fins where they remain for a few weeks or months. Larval mussels rarely harm infected fish under natural conditions. When they become juveniles, they drop back … [more…]

New Estimate Finds Less Fresh Groundwater in U.S. Than Previously Assumed

photo: drilling rig and drilling for water

Photo: Well drillers for Hydro Resources drill a well near Sublette, Kansas. Photo © Brian Lehmann / Circle of Blue By Brett Walton, Circle of Blue

Drilling deeper not a long-term strategy, authors say.

When a severe drought enveloped California a few years ago and rivers shriveled, farmers in the Central Valley punched wells deeper underground, seeking to tap water reserves that were untouched by aridity on the surface.

In … [more…]

Another Benefit of Renewable Energy: It Uses Practically No Water Compared to Fossil Fuels

photo: solar power cells installed, replacing fossil fuels energy sources

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently highlighted a little-discussed benefit of using renewables like wind and solar to produce electricity: Unlike most power sources, they require “almost no water.”

This is remarkable because thermoelectric power generation is the leading use of water in America. (That said, only three percent of power generation’s 133 billion gallons a day of water is considered “consumptive use,” as the U.S. Geological Survey says, “meaning … [more…]

Everything you need to know about water

photo: water faucet

In developing countries, 20 litres of water is enough to meet basic drinking, cooking and hand washing needs. Image: REUTERS/Aly Song

Water is one of the most valuable resources on Earth. It covers over two thirds of the planet’s surface, makes up around 70% of the human body and is essential for life. For many people a consistent supply of clean, safe water is on tap. But for many others … [more…]

Nuclear Reactor Wastewater Will End Up In Beaver Lake

Signage for Beaver Lake, Nuclear Reactor Wastewater

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Fayetteville City Council on Wednesday approved dumping wastewater from the site of a former nuclear reactor into the city’s sewer system.

The water will eventually flow into Beaver Lake, our area’s main source for drinking water.

One city council member thinks it’s a bad idea, but others claim it’s perfectly safe.

"We are actually dumping our sewage, what’s left of it into our drinking [water] source," said

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